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Wednesday, November 25, 2020 | History

1 edition of Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers found in the catalog.

Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers

Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers

explaining positive and negative effects in India

by

  • 369 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Madras School of Economics in Chennai .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementAnabel Marin and Subash Sasidharan
The Physical Object
Pagination47 p.
Number of Pages47
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24908131M
LC Control Number2011323664

  For example, the MNC may take advantage of interfirm spillovers of technological knowledge (Jaffe, Trajtenberg, & Henderson, ) that are captured by subsidiaries, or extract knowledge from sophisticated customers and skilled competitors by having specialized subsidiaries in strategic locations (Asmussen, Pedersen, & Dhanaraj, ; Dunning.   (10) We investigate the ways market reallocation and knowledge spillovers influence potential gains from MNC competition, and their relative importance, using a general analytical framework based on a standard model of MNC production and heterogeneous firms, accounting for self-selection of . Perspectives on Subsidiaries The Evolution of Subsidiary-Level Research Changing Roles: from Passive to Active Subsidiaries Internal and External Drivers of Subsidiary Evolution The Influence of the Internal Network The Influence of the External Network An Innovation Management Perspective Knowledge Creation


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Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers Download PDF EPUB FB2

Spillovers from MNCs to domestic firms continue to be hypothesised to arise almost automatically from technological assets created centrally in the MNC headquarters (Blomström and Person,Javorick,Chang and Xu, ).

2 The technological activities of the subsidiaries in the host economy are often not given credit for playing a Cited by: Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers: Explaining positive and negative effects in India Author links open overlay panel Anabel Marin a Subash Sasidharan b Show moreCited by: The Heterogeneity of MNC' Subsidiaries and Technology Spillovers: Explaining positive and negative effects in emerging economies Incorporating heterogeneous subsidiaries in models of.

Request PDF | Heterogeneous MNC Subsidiaries and Technological Spillovers: Explaining Positive and Negative Effects in India | One of the most intriguing aspects of the recent empirical literature.

Heterogeneous MNC Subsidiaries and Technological Spillovers: Explaining Positive and Negative Effects in India Anabel Marin and Subash Sasidharan Abstract One of the most intriguing aspects of the recent empirical literature on FDI-related spillover effects is the increasing identification of mixed results.

Downloadable. Conventional models of multinational corporation (MNC) related spillovers in host economies assume that they derive from the technological assets created at the headquarters. Subsidiaries' activities in the host economy are not given any role in this process.

In this paper, drawing on recent advances in MNC literature, we propose an alternative model. Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers: Explaining positive and negative effects in India subsidiaries oriented mostly to technologically exploitative activities generate negative effects in some circumstances.

The implications for theory and policy are logical spillovers MNCs Emerging economies. Anabel Marin & Subash Sasidharan, "Heterogeneous MNC Subsidiaries and Technological Spillovers: Explaining Positive and Negative Effects in India," Working PapersMadras School of Economics,Chennai,India.

Handle: RePEc:mad:wpaper Abstract. The usual perspective on technology spillovers from FDI sees the MNC subsidiary as a passive actor. It presumes that the technological superiority that spreads from subsidiaries to other firms in the host economy is initially created outside it by MNC parent companies, and is delivered to subsidiaries via international technology transfer.

MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS, TECHNOLOGY SPILLOVERS AND HUMAN RIGHTS’ IMPACTS ON DEVELOPING COUNTRIES Elisa Giuliani DEA, University of Pisa Via Ridolfi 10 Pisa Tel. +39 Email: [email protected] & SPRU, University of Sussex Freeman Centre, Falmer Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9QE United Kingdom ABSTRACT.

In contrast, subsidiaries oriented mostly to technologically exploitative activities generate negative effects in some circumstances. The implications for theory and policy are discussed.

Key Words: technological spillovers, MNCs, emerging economies, subsidiaries, heterogeneity. Strategy shifts in MNC subsidiaries.

Strategic Management Journal, –[Web of Science ®], [Google Scholar] is an exception to this pattern and identified a position similar to this – the ‘quiescent’ subsidiary that has limited localised activities and fewer linkages within the global corporation.

MNC strategies to limit knowledge spillovers: How subsidiaries manage their knowledge source breadth to decrease spillovers “Time is the enemy Strategies can quickly fall behind, so the rhythm of planning has to keep pace.

When technologies have disruptive potential, the stakes are even higher. DeepDyve is the largest online rental service for scholarly research with thousands of academic publications available at your fingertips.

Sean Tsu-Hsiang Hsu, Akie Iriyama, John E. Prescott, Lost in Translation or Lost in Your Neighbor's Yard: The Moderating Role of Leverage and Protection Mechanisms for the MNC Subsidiary Technology Sourcing–Performance Relationship, Journal of International Management, /, 22, 1, (), ().

first is that subsidiaries’ own technological activities contribute to the absorptive capacity of the subsidiary with respect to the technology transferred from the parent, thereby increasing the potential of spillovers in association with knowledge created by the MNC in other locations.

Anabel Marin, Subash Sasidharan, Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers: Explaining positive and negative effects in India, Research Policy, /, 39, 9, (), ().

Heterogeneous MNC’ subsidiaries and technological spillovers: explaining positive and negative effects in emerging economies’. UNU-Merit Working Paper Series, ().

International management and strategy’. We investigate how multinational companies can foster economic development of the host country at the micro level.

Traditionally the empirical literature measuring spillovers to the host economy arising from foreign direct investment has focused on productivity spillovers, i.e., technological externalities.

In this paper we emphasise that pecuniary externalities from multinationals can also be. Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers: Explaining positive and negative effects in India.

Research Policy, 39(9), McVicar, D. Marin A, Sasidharan S () Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers: explaining positive and negative effects in India.

Res Policy – CrossRef Google Scholar Mello D () Foreign direct investment in developing countries and growth: a selective survey.

In most cases, host countries access superior technology through technological spillovers and, this enhances the productivity of the local firms.

Campos (, p. 6) states, “In addition, host country firms may obtain other potential productivity spillovers that the presence of MNC. The literature identifies spillovers as a major mechanism through which firms transfer and acquire knowledge.

Theories of endogenous technological change (Grossman, Helpman ) demonstrate that since knowledge and technology are partially public, then knowledge can be acquired or produced by another firm without incurring large additional costs. International knowledge spillovers, especially through multinational companies (MNCs), have recently been a major topic of academic and management debate.

However, most studies treat MNC subsidiaries as relatively passive actors. We challenge this assumption by investigating the drivers of knowledge protection intensity of MNC subsidiaries.

trade and research-and-development (R&D) spillovers with the aim of finding ways to track the spillover effects of agricultural trade at firm and industry levels. The term R&D spillover refers to the spread or diffusion of knowledge between countries, industries, or firms.

New technological and managerial. Books and journals Case studies Expert Briefings Open Access. Advanced search. Chapter 13 The Innovation Outcomes of MNC Subsidiaries' Local Embeddedness: Evidence from the German ‘Bioregion Rhein-Neckar-Dreieck’ Local Network. Andreas Al-Laham, Suleika Bort.

Entrepreneurship in the Global Firm. MNC subsidiaries on the productivity of DOMs. Our analytical framework goes a step forward; by using firm level data for the period we assess the role of exporting, R&D and intangible assets of both MNC subsidiaries and DOMs in regional productivity convergence.

MNC Affliliate (subsidiary of foreign firm) Domestic Competitors (firms in the same sector) MNC Parent Large positive vertical productivity effects + Scale and demand effects + Direct assistance Ve + Quality requirements rt.

upstream effects Ve rt. downstream effects FDI increases the productivity of target firms + Technology/capability transfer. MNC subsidiary’s sector will tend to experience limited technological gains ensuing FDI, whereas producers technological spillovers of FDI.

In particular, the degree to which the use of the MNC's proprietary panel data to derive aggregate behavior from heterogeneous sectoral adjustment. This paper investigates the effect of foreign direct investment on productivity growth in the manufacturing industries of Spain.

A theoretical model that includes the effects of technological gaps and absorptive capacity, both presenting nonlinear relationships is proposed.

A sample of Spanish manufacturing firms from to was used. Threshold regression made it possible to. Integrating Perspectives The Relevance of Locations for MNC Innovation The Case of FDI Spillovers to Host-locations Antecedents of FDI Knowledge Spillovers Macro-level Perspectives Meso-level Perspectives Micro-level Perspectives Implications for the Study of FDI Spillovers to Host-locations 6.

Balancing the Trade-Off between Learning Prospects and Spillover Risks: MNC Subsidiaries' Vertical Linkage Patterns in Developed Countries. Journal of World Business, Forthcoming. 44 Pages Posted: 12 Sep we look at the dual role of such linkages as conduits for learning as well as potential channels for spillovers to competitors.

Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers: Explaining positive and negative effects in India A Marin, S Sasidharan Research Policy 39 (9),BLOMKVIST, K.

Reverse Technology Diffusion: On the Diffusion of Technological Capabilities from Advanced Foreign Subsidiaries to Headquarters of the MNC, in Proceedings of EIBA Conference, Reshaping the Boundaries of the Firm in an Era of Global Interdependence, December, Valencia.

BUCKELY, P. & CASSON, M. Abstract A large number of studies have used firm‐level data to examine whether foreign direct investment (FDI) generates knowledge spillovers to domestically owned firms in.

The knowledge diffusion and spillovers to the host country via FDIs usually involves a two stage process, namely, the knowledge transfer from MNC headquarters and/or sister subsidiaries to the subsidiary in the host country (intra-network knowledge sharing), and the spillovers from the host subsidiary to the host industry.

MNC foreign subsidiaries are more agglomerative than domestic plants in capital- skilled labor- and R&D-intensive industries. In industries with greater than median levels of capital intensity, the distribution of agglomeration indices is rightward-shifted for MNC foreign subsidiaries compared to domestic plants.

Extract. Chapter 6 21/6/02 AM Page 1 6. Sources of subsidiary knowledge and knowledge transfer in MNCs 1 Nicolai J. Foss and Torben Pedersen INTRODUCTION It is now commonly accepted that knowledge ranks first in the hierarchy of strategically relevant resources (e.g., Grant ), in fact, it is so widely accepted ‘ as to have become almost axiomatic’ (Gupta and.

Anabel Marin, Subash Sasidharan (), Heterogeneous MNC subsidiaries and technological spillovers: Explaining positive and negative effects in India, Research Policy, Vol Issue 9, NovemberPages Anabel Marin and Martin Bell (), Technology spillovers.

MNC’s can clearly find it in their interest to help increase the competitiveness and quality of their suppliers, and they can do so either making their technology available to them, or by providing strong incentives for them to adapt (Kokko ).

Transfers of technology through such linkages are referred to as inter-industry spillovers. A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.

Black's Law Dictionary suggests that a company or group should be considered a multinational corporation if it derives 25% or more of its revenue from out-of-home-country operations.technology spillover and social interaction that has suggested the existence of both industry and regional spillovers across –rms.

As expected, our results show a positive and signi–cant correlation between a –rm™s productivity and that of its reference groups, especially for –rms 3.Third, if outsourcing is profitable for the subsidiary, MNC management will encourage knowledge sharing with suppliers.

This process yields inter-industry spillovers that should be observed as productivity improvements in upstream sectors. Hence, the technical knowhow that is most likely to generate new technological opportunities for host-country.